• Bedford Primary School Educate Magazine Lancashire Wildlife Trust

Burgers and bugs at Bedford Primary School

Pupils, parents and teachers from Bedford Primary School in Bootle, came together with the Lancashire Wildlife Trust to celebrate the end of term in forest school style.

Since January, the Lancashire Wildlife Trust’s forest school project has been working with Bedford Primary, delivering free weekly forest school sessions and training school staff as forest school leaders, thanks to support from players of People’s Postcode Lottery.

Children and adults alike played games, searched for insects and enjoyed a campfire cookout within the school’s beautiful outdoor learning space.

Many of the parents commented that their children often talk excitedly about forest school at home, so it was great to experience it for themselves. One father was stunned to see his son playing games and chatting with the other children, saying: “He (my son) suffers from Asperger’s and he wasn’t doing well in class and was not talking or making friends. Once he attended forest school things started to change, you can see him now running around with other children and wanting to join in with activities.”

Laura Doherty, a teacher at Bedford Primary said: “The children who have taken part in sessions range from six to 11-years-old and they have all grown in confidence and developed their teamwork and leadership skills.

“It has been wonderful to spend time outdoors together and learn more about nature and the plants and animals that live right outside our classroom. The sessions are always the highlight of our week.

“As a teacher, it has been lovely to spend time with children in an environment outside the classroom and nurture such a range of different talents and qualities with our young people.

Forest School officer Molly Toal said, “When the children started forest school in January, there were situations that a lot of the children found quite difficult to be in, such as waiting to take turns using tools, sharing toys in the mud kitchen, or playing games together. They would struggle with team-work, understanding others, solving problems and being patient – all skills that are useful in wider life.”

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