• Health-related projects planned for 2017 by LJMU

Call to all primary schools

Researchers from Liverpool John Moores University’s School of Sport and Exercise Sciences are looking for primary schools to participate in several new projects focused on children’s physical activity and health.

Being active is essential for children’s physical, mental and emotional health. For example, taking part in physical activity helps to build children’s confidence and social skills, strengthen muscles and bones, improve coordination, health and fitness, and positively impacts on concentration and learning.

The researchers have several new physical activity and health-related projects planned for 2017 onwards, examining topics such as assessing physical literacy, improving physical education, examining the impact of second-hand smoke exposure on children’s fitness, and children’s sitting time.

The School of Sport and Exercise Sciences has worked in partnership with children and schools across Merseyside for over 20 years, producing world-class research which helps put the region on the global map.

The school was recently named the sixth best sport sciences department in the world according to the Academic Ranking of World Universities, highlighting the school’s global influence.

Dr Lawrence Foweather, senior lecturer in physical activity, exercise and health from the school’s physical activity exchange research group said: “Our world-leading research in young children, children, and young people simply would not have been possible without the hard work, support and assistance of countless children, parents, teachers, children’s centres and schools across Merseyside.

“We warmly welcome expressions of interest from primary schools that would like to take part in these exciting projects.

“We are driven to improve children’s health and well-being and at the heart of all our research projects is a desire to positively impact policy and practice.

“We find that children really enjoy taking part in our research studies, not just because they are encouraged to be more active and healthy, but because participation is a valuable education experience.

“School staff also note that involvement is positive and particularly enjoy sharing their insight and feedback, which is extremely important for the research.”

Primary schools that are interested in taking part in any of these projects, or would like to offer suggestions for others, should contact Dr Lawrence Foweather on L.Foweather@ljmu.ac.uk or 0151 231 4152.

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